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Dr George Poulogiannis

Team Leader

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Dr George Poulogiannis is studying the signalling and metabolic processes that cause cell growth and the emergence of cancer. He has worked at many research institutions and as a member of the Joint Centre for Systems Oncology, is an academic affiliate of Imperial College London. Team: Signalling & Cancer Metabolism

Biography

Dr George Poulogiannis is a Team Leader in the Division of Cancer Biology at the Institute of Cancer Research, London. He received his BSc in Molecular and Cellular Biology from the University of Glasgow and his MSc in Human Molecular Genetics from Imperial College London. He earned his PhD from the University of Cambridge, where he studied the genome abnormalities of colorectal cancer at the laboratory of Prof Andrew Wyllie and Dr Mark Arends. The high demand for analytical skills during his PhD work led him to pursue a second Masters in Computational Biology at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics at the University of Cambridge, where he was specialized in mathematical modeling of signaling and metabolic networks and analysis of high-throughput datasets.

For his postdoctoral research, Dr Poulogiannis joined the laboratory of Prof Lewis Cantley at Harvard Medical School to study the signalling and metabolic networks that are associated with the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In 2011, he received the Life Sciences Research Foundation Fellowship for his work entitled "Defining the Genetic and Molecular Circuitry of the Growth-Triggering TOR Pathway" and in 2013, he joined the faculty of ICR to lead the Signalling and Cancer Metabolism team. Dr Poulogiannis is also an academic affiliate of Imperial College and his team is part of the Joint Centre for Systems Oncology and Cancer Innovation. The major focus of his laboratory is to utilize in vitro cell biology approaches, genetically engineered mouse models and high-throughput technologies to study the signalling and metabolic networks that are related to cell growth and oncogenesis.

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