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News and features

The Institute of Cancer Research, London, media team works to increase the profile of the organisation by showcasing the cutting-edge research carried out by our scientists and development initiatives. 

For more information you can always contact our media team, or visit our press release archive to view a list of our press releases. 

News

Simple blood test can quantify drug effects on protein signals to guide cancer treatment 22
Oct
2014

Taking a new cancer drug once a week could benefit patients by giving healthy tissues time to recover from the effects of treatment, as suggested by a simple blood test, according to a new clinical trial. Find out more

Student on a summer placement develops new way of visualising genetics data 17
Oct
2014

A student on a short-term placement at The Institute of Cancer Research, London, has led development of a new tool to visualise and analyse complex genetics data sets. Find out more

ICR team scores 100% success in the Royal Parks Half Marathon 14
Oct
2014

All 22 intrepid runners for The Institute of Cancer Research successfully completed Sunday’s gruelling 13-mile Royal Parks Half Marathon to raise vital funds for our research. Find out more

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Features

Using crystals to cure cancer 08
Oct
2014

Each year, the ICR runs a science writing competition among our scientists and students – and here is 2014’s winning piece Find out more

Exploiting the cell cycle to improve radiotherapy outcomes 20
Aug
2014

One of the crucial signalling networks that often go awry in cancer are those that respond to DNA damage and regulate the cell cycle progression. But now researchers are turning this to their advantage, and are attacking cancer by targeting one of the very processes that drives it – a faulty DNA repair response. Find out more

Darwinian evolution: from dinosaurs to cancer drug resistance 15
Jul
2014

Birds evolving from dinosaurs, fish emerging from the sea, and hominids adopting an upright posture – all are iconic examples of evolution. On the surface they don’t have a great deal to do with cancer, but the process underlying them both — natural selection — is identical. Find out more

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