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The Institute of Cancer Research attracts the very best science graduates and clinicians to carry out cutting-edge research and make the discoveries that defeat cancer. Our students enjoy working in a high-tech and collaborative environment, in which their research can be translated into direct benefits for patients.

David McBay

David McBay

David McBay's PhD project aims to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy.

What is your background?

I studied an integrated Master of Science in genetics at UCL prior to joining the ICR.

What are you studying now/who with?

My PhD project aims to understand the molecular mechanisms that determine the effectiveness of fractionated radiotherapy.

I am based on the Chelsea campus in Professor Jessica DownsGenome Stability team laboratory, with Professor John Yarnold as my project lead.

Why did you want to study at the ICR?

What attracted me to the ICR was the quality of its research outputs combined with the cross-disciplinary teamwork, both of which are enabled by the relatively small size of the institution. 

What’s the best thing about working at the ICR?

The people! A diverse group of like-minded, driven staff and students makes for an enjoyable working atmosphere day to day.

What do you do to unwind in your spare time?

I play a bizarre sport called canoe polo with the University of London team – essentially it’s kayaking and water polo combined!

One fun fact about you

I once got trapped overnight by the mafia at a remote Asian airport.

Any tips/advice for future students?

It is your own project! If you are deadline driven (like me) you have to be strict with your own personal deadlines.

Do you know what you want to do next?

Not at this moment, especially as I am still right in the middle of my project.

What opportunities has studying at the ICR given you?

In my first year I was based at the University of Sussex as a collaborative student.

The support from staff there, experiencing Brighton and moving with the lab to the ICR taught me a lot about the importance of scientific collaboration.

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