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EORTC1206-HNCG

A randomised phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy versus androgen deprivation therapy in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic, androgen receptor expressing, salivary gland cancer.

Disease site: Head and neck cancer

Treatment modality: Systemic therapy

Status: In set up

Trial details

EORTC1206-HNCG is an international multicentre, randomised phase II study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of chemotherapy compared with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT; triptorelin and bicalutamide) in people with recurrent and/or metastatic, androgen receptor (AR) expressing, salivary gland cancer.

The study comprises two patient cohorts:

  • Cohort A, which comprises patients who previously have not been treated with chemotherapy. Patients will be randomised 1:1 to receive ADT or standard (control) chemotherapy.
  • Cohort B, which comprises patients who have progressed on standard chemotherapy, will receive ADT.

The aim is to enrol 152 participants globally; 76 into cohort A (38 in each arm) and approximately the same number of patients in cohort B. The UK will contribute up to 30 patients in total.

 Participants will be followed up until disease progression and yearly thereafter.

Further information

Global Chief Investigator: Dr Lisa Licitra, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy

UK National Coordinating Investigator: Professor Kevin Harrington, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and The Institute of Cancer Research

ICR-CTSU Scientific Lead: Dr Emma Hall

UK trial management contact: [email protected]

ISRCTN: N/A

Sponsor: European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC)

Funding: EORTC, Belgium; Bluefish Pharmaceuticals AB, Sweden; and Cancer Research UK (CRUK/13/016)

Publications and presentations

There have been no presentations or publications to date.

Clinical trials

Division of Clinical Studies

The division carries out or coordinates high-quality trials and translational research at both an early phase – typically to test new targeted drugs – and a later stage.